July 17: We have a new show up at Shin Gallery! The exhibition centers around Nam June Paik’s “Big Shoulder” from 1998. It also features numerous prints by Paik and a sound installation by Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos. The exhibit is called "The Legacy of Nam June Paik in the Post-Digital Age" and raises questions about the meaning of technology in our lives while also calling to attention the innovation of Nam June Paik as the first video artist. The show goes until July 31 so please stop by!
(Rachel Garbade)

July 17: We have a new show up at Shin Gallery! The exhibition centers around Nam June Paik’s “Big Shoulder” from 1998. It also features numerous prints by Paik and a sound installation by Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos. The exhibit is called "The Legacy of Nam June Paik in the Post-Digital Age" and raises questions about the meaning of technology in our lives while also calling to attention the innovation of Nam June Paik as the first video artist. The show goes until July 31 so please stop by!

(Rachel Garbade)

July 16: I also work at Canada, a gallery on the lower east side of Manhattan on Broome Street. It also features contemporary art, but is much more established and international than Shin Gallery. This current show features French artists and work from the 1970s, called Supports/Surfaces. The show ends on July 20th, so be sure to check it out soon! I can’t believe it’s taken me this long to photograph it!

(Rachel Garbade)

July 15: I will never understand how humans builds sky scrapers. They are just so damn big.
(Rachel Garbade)

July 15: I will never understand how humans builds sky scrapers. They are just so damn big.

(Rachel Garbade)

July 14: In honor of Bastille Day, I bought and ate six macarons. 
(Rachel Garbade)

July 14: In honor of Bastille Day, I bought and ate six macarons. 

(Rachel Garbade)

July 13: And that’s a wrap! ArtHamptons is over! My brain is officially unable to process anymore art. In fact, today I spent most of the time in my own booth (pictured here), rather than looking at more visual stimuli. I will be going on an art cleanse for the next week whereby I only look at blank white walls. Oh and I’m going to sleep for days — art fairs are exhausting!

(Rachel Garbade)

July 12: It’s day three at ArtHamptons and I pretty much know the place by heart. I’ve seen every booth at least twice. I’ve ventured into the outdoor sculpture garden. I’ve explained every piece of work in our booth at least thirty times. But, it remains exciting. Today I’ve started to engage with other booth owners, just to see how they explain their art and to see how their sales are going. It’s nice to think of the art world as a community.

(Rachel Garbade)

July 11: The sunset in the Hamptons is okay.
(Rachel Garbade)

July 11: The sunset in the Hamptons is okay.

(Rachel Garbade)

July 11: Day two went very well. While we had initially been disappointed in the lack of sales from day one, day two proved to be much more fruitful. I sold my very first piece of artwork — for $30,000. Ok. It was Jong-wan Choo’s Emergence from 2011. Beyond just the sale though, the day was fun. When I was working I had many opportunities to talk to many people about the artwork in our booth. On my breaks I got to walk around and look at all the other booths. Everyone had vastly different contemporary art so I was constantly seeing new things and being awed. There were certainly a lot of pieces I wanted to take home with me, but unfortunately I am an unpaid intern without $30,000 to spare. Such is life.

(Rachel Garbade)

July 10: After driving for three hours to the Hamptons, the Shin Gallery team had to unload the UHaul and start putting up the artwork in our booth at ArtHamptons immediately. We put up twelve pieces in two hours. It was fast but precise. Once we were done unpacking and installing we threw the cardboard boxes into storage, put on our party outfits, and got ready for the opening night celebration. It was truly a rush. The energy was high all night long. Thinking about the fact that I would be at this art fair for the next three days was wonderful because, after all, art is my number one passion. 

(Rachel Garbade)

July 9: I find that there is an effortless chicness to the design of the citibike. Everyone genuinely looks cool riding one.
(Rachel Garbade)

July 9: I find that there is an effortless chicness to the design of the citibike. Everyone genuinely looks cool riding one.

(Rachel Garbade)

July 8: Koons is taking over New York City. And this blog. Today during my lunch hour I went to Rockefeller Center to check out his latest “Split Rocker.” It was huge and commanded quite a presence. And I had the added bonus of seeing employees add flowers to it, which reminded me that it really is a living piece of art. 

(Rachel Garbade)

July 7: Today I woke up, went to the gym, did some laundry, read on this rooftop courtyard, and bought groceries. It was a delightful and productive day. 
(Rachel Garbade)

July 7: Today I woke up, went to the gym, did some laundry, read on this rooftop courtyard, and bought groceries. It was a delightful and productive day. 

(Rachel Garbade)

July 6: After cruising through the Whitney Museum, the Met, and the Neue Galerie, I decided to visit Central Park. I entered around 85th street on the east side and left around 60th street on the west side. I walked alone. I’ve noticed I’ve been spending a lot of time alone, drinking tea in a coffee shop or visiting the latest art exhibit opening or wandering around Central Park. There’s something indescribably satisfying about accomplishing a lot on my own, but I can’t help but wonder how my latest experiences would have been different with someone by my side.

(Rachel Garbade)

July 6: Despite the absence of people in these photos, the Whitney Museum of American Art was packed today. I went back to the Jeff Koons exhibit hoping to be able to wander around in a little quieter environment, but I was mistaken. However, this time I looked around the exhibit with a new perspective, mostly influenced by Bill Cunningham’s photos and the reviews I read. I looked at the woman in orange shorts next to the pile of play doh. I saw the couple stroll sheepishly past the explicit oil paintings. I saw the little children point at the balloon animal, asking if they could touch it. Jeff Koons’ oeuvre is so impressive because it invites the viewer’s reaction. You want to interact with each piece, touch the balloon animal and see if the surface moves or find out if the inflatable pieces are really made out of plastic or if they are some kind of steel. It’s a wonderful exhibit.

(Rachel Garbade)

July 5: Featured for the third time on this blog, here is my favorite apartment block on Sullivan Street. I want to live in the purple one.
(Rachel Garbade)

July 5: Featured for the third time on this blog, here is my favorite apartment block on Sullivan Street. I want to live in the purple one.

(Rachel Garbade)